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About Mike

Favorite Grubs:
Spicy hummus, fruit & veggies

Best Flicks:
Casablanca, Lawrence of Arabia, Les Miserables, Romancing the Stone, Sixth Sense, Anything with Ingrid Bergman...

Jams To:
Kanye West, Jay-Z, Springsteen, Elton John, Eurythmics, Pop.

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Revealing Questions

Q. How would you describe your life in only 8 words?
A. An adventure into creativity and fun.

Q. What is your motto or maxim?
A. Thoughts Become Things... Choose The Good Ones!

Q. How would you describe perfect happiness?
A. The feeling I have after having spoken to an appreciative audience.

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On Books and Writing

Q. Who are your favorite authors?
A. Ayn Rand, Jane Roberts (The "Seth" Books), Richard Bach.

Q. What are your 5 favorite books of all time?
A. Atlas Shrugged, Illusions, The Prophet, Siddhartha, The Nature of Personal Reality. See Mike's Recommended Reading

Q. Do you have one sentence of advice for new writers?
A. Only write if you have something you really want to say.

Q. What comment do you hear most often from your readers?
A. That they can relate to exactly what I'm sharing.


Introduction

Mike Dooley is a former PriceWaterhouseCoopers international tax consultant, turned entrepreneur, who’s founded a philosophical Adventurers Club on the Internet that’s now home to over 500,000 members from over 185 countries. His inspirational books emphasizing spiritual accountability have been published in 25 languages and he was one of the featured teachers in the international phenomenon, The Secret. Today Mike is perhaps best known for his free Notes from the Universe emailings and his New York Times bestsellers Infinite Possibilities: The Art of Living Your Dreams and Leveraging the Universe: 7 Steps to Engaging Life’s Magic. Mike lives what he teaches, traveling internationally speaking on life, dreams, and happiness. Find out more at tut.com.


Biography

I used to think everyone knew something that I didn't. They, like I, weren't aware of what it was, and they didn't seem to notice that I was without it, but to me the difference was painful. Life's "little things" seemed second nature to others, whereas I felt I had to fake that I knew what was going on. I felt awkwardly different, which led to an overwhelming desire to question the things that most people seem to take for granted. A burning desire to know what this life is about, which I have now largely satisfied, making the price of my sensed alienation very small in comparison.

For me, in the beginning, my search for answers generally centered around the issues of life, death, and the powers of the mind, but within these there were many other topics like time, space, heaven, hell, hypnosis, UFO's, ghost stories, ESP, the dream state, reincarnation, etc. I had arrived at several basic conclusions for each, but they were just hunches. Without knowing how I knew, for example, at the age of 12 or 13 I remember telling my mother that space and time couldn't really exist, and that neither could hell, or a God that wasn't One with all things, living and inanimate. I reasoned that He was not just inside Us all, but that no part of our experience could ever be anything less than 100% God.

I didn't realize it at the time but my desire to "know" had put me on an inner path of understanding, or better my thinking was beginning to attract like thinking. As if my questions were slowly answering themselves, opening my eyes to the insights that are latent in us all. As I walked this path the questions I dwelled upon were somehow answered. I was never sure just when the answers had arrived. I only sensed, sometime after "illumination", that an intuitive knowing had been imparted when I wasn't paying close attention.

The first time I remember physically pursuing my fascinations with life's mysteries was at the age of 14. Hypnosis was an exciting and bizarre affair I thought, so I checked some books out from my high school's library, and bought a few short "how to" ones of my own. In very little time I was successfully hypnotizing some of the younger neighborhood kids who looked to me with some authority, but it all became very boring when I ran out of ideas of what to say or do once my subjects had gone under. My favorite tricks like having their fingers go numb so that their big brothers could prick them with pins, telling them that they could no longer open their eyes, or having them blurt out nonsense when given post-hypnotic triggers, lost their appeal. No one had bad habits to break, and I had no success with anyone my age or older.

Exploring hypnosis I gleaned several breakthroughs. First that the process worked, I saw the mind's influence over the body and its thoughts, and second, while rummaging in the school library I discovered The Search for Bridey Murphy, by Morey Bernstein. It blew my 9th grade mind. I couldn't understand why everyone didn't have a copy, or why the teachers and adults I knew hadn't heard of it. Surely, I thought, this was revolutionary material that should be studied and queried by the greatest minds of the world. But as far as I knew that hadn't happened since Bridey's publication in 1956. Nevertheless, the paranormal events and conditions described in Bridey made perfect sense to me, paralleling many of my own inner suspicions, and opening doors in my thinking that enabled me to ponder even greater questions.

Although raised a church-going Catholic I found many of their teachings, rules and rituals contradictory, and more importantly, inconsistent with the answers I had intuitively arrived at. I've always believed, for example, that each of us is really doing our best given our own understandings, therefore if judgment were to be passed on a life, and I don't believe it is, sin would only ever be regarded as an honest "mistake" due to deep misunderstandings. Not a demerit system that leads to eternal damnation. Wouldn't a loving Father, I reasoned, have more compassion than to seek revenge on his comparatively feeble children who are temporarily blinded by the illusions they've created? Even human parents are far more understanding of their own flesh and blood than the "Father" as portrayed in most religions. Sin, and its past and present connotations, must have been a term derived by man I concluded, not an understanding, all-knowing God.

I've always needed explanations that made sense, and just as importantly, I believed they were attainable. I came to deduce, and still believe, that Jesus was here to tell us, as others have, that we are all "children of God", that the things he did, we all can do, and that there are no sins, no evil, no hell, other than what exists in our own minds. He came to Earth to be a living example of these teachings, to show a better way to his fellow travelers at a dark time in history when limiting beliefs were so ingrained into the population they no longer sought, nor could they conceive of, greater thinking.

Despite my early quest for hypnosis books, I've never been a "reader". Since attending college I've probably averaged only 1-2 new books a year. So it's ironic that over my life, several books, or authors, have helped define my own thoughts, and therefore my life, in the most profound ways.

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Orlando, Florida